BFS Logo
 Bristol Free School

BFS Logo

Image of student
6th Form Curriculum Guide - Year 13 Religion & Philosophy
Term 1 Weeks 1 to 7Gods, God and Ultimate Reality/Sources of Wisdom and Authority   
Students will consider Monotheism and think about the terms 'omnipotent creator', 'controller', 'unknowable', 'Trinity' and 'Jesus'. They will study 'God as personal', 'God as Love' and 'God as Father' and finish with God in Process Theology before reviewing learning for assessment. Students will then move on to look at Sources of Wisdom and Authority: The Bible; different Christian beliefs about the nature and authority of the Bible and their impact on its use as a source of beliefs and teachings including the Bible as inspired by God but written by human beings. The Church; the different perspectives of the Protestant and Catholic traditions on the relative authority of the Bible and the Church. The Authority of Jesus
Assessment: Regularly marked essays plus a 45 minute assessment in controlled conditions.Key Words and Terms
 
Term 2 Weeks 8 to 14Self, Death and the Afterlife/Religion and Science   
Students will consider the meaning and purpose of life and the following purposes and their relative importance: to gorlify God and have a personal relationship with him; to prepare for judgement; to bring about God's kingdom on earth. Students will then move on to study the Resurrection; the concept of the soul; the resurrection of the flesh as expressed in the writings of Augustine; spiritual resurrection and the significance of 1 Corinthians 15:42-44 and 50-54. The next area of study will be different interpretations of judgement; heaven, hell and purgatory as physical, spiritual or psychological realities; objective immortality in process thought. There will then be an overview of Self, Death and the Afterlife prior to an assessment. Students will end the topic with the study of Religion and Science including how scientific explanation has challenged Christian belief with reference to the 'God of the gaps'; 19th Century Christian responses to Darwin's theory of evolution.
Assessment: Key Words and Terms
 
Term 3 Weeks 15 to 20Religion and Religious Pluralism 
Students will consider how migration has created multicultural societies which include Christianity with particular reference to the diversity of faiths in Britain today. They will consider freedom of religion as a human right in European Law and religious pluralism as a feature of modern secular states. Next to be studied will be Christian attitudes to other faiths: Exclusivism with reference to John 14:6; Inclusivism with reference to the concept of 'anonymous Christians' and how Christian denominations view each other. Students will look at Pluralism with reference to John Hick and its implications for interfaith and interdenominational relations and consider Christian responses to issues of freedom of religious expression in society.
Assessment: Key Words and Terms
 
Term 4 Weeks 21 to 25Dialogue/Self and Life After Death   
The main topics of study in this unit are: God; Self, death and the afterlife; religious experience; the relationship between scientific and religious discourses; the truth claims of other religions and 'Miracles'. These will be considered alongside the following questions: How far is the belief reasonable? How meaningful is the statement of faith and for whom? How coherent are the beliefs and how consistent are they with other beliefs in the belief system? How relevant is the philosophical enquiry for religious faith? Students will end the unit with the study of the nature and existence of the soul; Descartes and the Body and Soul relationship and the possibility of continuing personal existence after death.
Assessment: Key Words and Terms
 
Term 5 Weeks 26 to 32Miracles/Arguments for the Existence of God  
Students will consider differing understandings of 'miracle' realist and anti-realist views. They will think about the violation of natural law and/or event and compare the key ideas of David Hume and Maurice Wiles on miracles. They will then move on to the study of arguments for and against the existence of God including: the Design argument; the Ontological argument; the Cosmological argument; Hick's soul making theodicy; Process theodicy (Griffin) and the weaknesses and strengths of each response to evil and suffering.
Assessment: Regularly marked essays plus a 45 minute assessment in controlled conditions.Key Words and Terms
 

Login